Our Misson •  Why So Much Passion for Safe Pest Control? •  The Facts About Safe Pest Control •  Testimonials •  Schedule Service
Common Pests      Safe Pest Control Services      Health Issues      Broader Pesticide Issues
Cash Incentive Programs      AlwaysEco Opportunities      Get Eco Certified      Post Your Comments      Contact      Home
Bug Chart
Safety Facts on Pest Control
Schedule Service
 

Info Window Control






Alzheimer's Disease |  Asthma |  Birth Defects |  Cancer (31 Types) |  Diabetes |  Endocrine Disruption
Learning & Developmental Disorders (ADHD/Autism) |  Parkinson's Disease |  Reproductive Health



Many people wonder why AlwaysEco goes to such lengths to put so much medical research into your hands. Our motive is quite sensible. The EPA, NIH, National Cancer Institute and other national or global organizations are detached from the daily lives of most working adults. Many people never have an opportunity to browse research databases or government websites for answers to the biggest problem of our generation - pesticide-induced diseases. Who better to bring this information to you than AlwaysEco, the company that will service your family and home for years to come with 100% All Natural Products that are clearly labeled "Safe Around Children And Pets." You should be able to trust us to know the facts. Your pest control company should know how to protect your family from exposure to harmful pesticides while protecting your home from insect invasions and damage. If your previous pest control company put one drop of toxin on your property, they failed you miserably. We will not fail you. We bring knowledge, skill, passion, and loyalty to the table because your life and the lives of your children and pets matter to us. How could any pest control company spend time around your family, sometimes for many years, while in the background they slowly but surely contaminate your home and subject your family to known poisons, cancer causing agents, and suspected carcinogens?

Please take the time to review a sample of our database below. This is only the tip of the iceberg of our knowledge and factual data. If after reading the medical research on our site you still believe that allowing a poison spraying pest control company to put toxic synthetic pesticides on your property and in places where your children and pets frequent is a good idea, we will give you a one-of-a-kind free gift just for visiting our website.

    Alzheimer's Disease


  1. Occupational exposure to pesticides increases the risk of incident AD

  2. Occupational risk factors in Alzheimer's disease: a review assessing the quality of published epidemiological studies

  3. Neurodegenerative Diseases and Exposure to Pesticides in the Elderly

  4. Risk factors for Alzheimer's disease: a population-based, longitudinal study in Manitoba, Canada

    Top of Page





    Asthma


  5. Rhinitis associated with pesticide exposure among commercial pesticide applicators in the Agricultural Health Study

  6. Pesticides and Atopic and Nonatopic Asthma among Farm Women in the Agricultural Health Study

  7. Pesticides and Atopic and Nonatopic Asthma among Farm Women in the Agricultural Health Study

  8. Summary health statistics for U.S. children: National Health Interview Survey, 2003.

  9. Asthma's Impact on Children and Adolescents

  10. Asthma Prevalence and Control Characteristics by Race/Ethnicity - United States, 2002

  11. Asthma and the environment: Connecting the dots

  12. Early-Life Environmental Risk Factors for Asthma: Findings from the Children's Health Study

  13. Health impacts of pesticide exposure in a cohort of outdoor workers.

  14. Respiratory symptoms in children and exposure to pesticides

  15. Respiratory symptoms in children and exposure to pesticides

  16. Occupational asthma from fungicides fluazinam and chlorothalonil.

  17. Asthma the Breathtaking Disease

  18. Identifying and managing adverse environmental health effects: 4. Pesticides.

  19. Hazardous air pollutants and asthma

  20. Chemical predictors of wheeze among farmer pesticide applicators in the Agricultural Health Study.

  21. Fatal asthma in a child after use of an animal shampoo containing pyrethrin

  22. Asthma to tetramethrin.

  23. Exposures of children to organophosphate pesticides and their potential adverse health effects.

  24. Is the increase in asthma prevalence occurring in children without a family history of atopy?
  25. Five office workers inadvertently exposed to cypermethrin

  26. Indoor spraying with the pyrethroid insecticide lambda-cyhalothrin: effects on spraymen and inhabitants of sprayed houses.

  27. Occupational exposure to some synthetic pyrethroids (permethrin and fenvalerate).

  28. Insecticides: household use and respiratory impairment

    Top of Page





    Birth Defects


  29. Glyphosate Formulations Induce Apoptosis and Necrosis in Human Umbilical, Embryonic, and Placental Cells.

  30. Agrichemicals in surface water and birth defects in the United States

  31. Use of biocides and insect repellents and risk of hypospadias

  32. Cryptorchidism at birth in Nice area (France) is associated with higher prenatal exposure to PCBs and DDE, as assessed by colostrum concentrations

  33. Mammary Gland Development as a Sensitive End Point after Acute Prenatal Exposure to an Atrazine Metabolite Mixture in Female Long-Evans Rats

  34. Differential Effects of Glyphosate and Roundup on Human Placental Cells and Aromatase

  35. Low-Dose Agrochemicals and Lawn-Care Pesticides Induce Developmental Toxicity in Murine Preimplantation Embryos

  36. Birth Malformations and Other Adverse Perinatal Outcomes in Four U.S. Wheat-Producing States.

  37. Effects of Transplacental Exposure to Environmental Pollutants on Birth Outcomes in a Multiethnic Population

  38. Developmental neurotoxicity of chlorpyrifos modeled in vitro: Comparative effects of metabolites and other cholinesterase inhibitors on DNA synthesis in PC12 and C6 cells.

  39. Chlorpyrifos (Dursban)-associated birth defects: report of four cases.

  40. Pesticide appliers, biocides, and birth defects in rural Minnesota.

    Top of Page





    Bladder Cancer


  41. Cancer among farmers in central Italy

  42. Heterocyclic aromatic amine pesticide use and human cancer risk: results form the U.S. Agricultural Health Study

  43. Geographical differences of cancer incidence in Costa Rica in relation to environmental and occupational pesticide exposure

    Top of Page





    Bone Cancer


  44. Geographical differences of cancer incidence in Costa Rica in relation to environmental and occupational pesticide exposure

  45. Occupational factors and risk of adult bone sarcomas: a multicentric case-control study in Europe

  46. Risk of childhood cancers associated with residence in agriculturally intense areas in the United States

  47. Ewing’s bone sarcoma, paternal occupational exposure, and other factors

  48. Parental occupational exposures and Ewing’s sarcoma

    Top of Page





    Brain Cancer

    Childhood Brain Cancer

  49. Childhood brain tumors, residential insecticide exposure, and pesticide metabolism genes

  50. Household pesticides and risk of pediatric brain tumors

  51. Incidence and risk factors for childhood brain tumors in the Ile de France.

  52. Family pesticide use and childhood brain cancer.

  53. Paternal occupation and brain cancer in offspring: a mortality-based case-control study

  54. Risk factors for brain tumors in children

    Top of Page





    Adult Brain Cancer


  55. Occupational exposure to pesticides and risk of adult brain tumors.

  56. Brain tumours and exposure to pesticides: a case-control study in southwestern France.

  57. Agricultural pesticide use and risk of glioma in Nebraska, United States

  58. Occupational risk factors for brain cancer: a population-based case-control study in Iowa

  59. Brain cancer mortality among French farmers: the vineyard pesticide hypothesis.

  60. Correlation analysis of pesticide use data and cancer incidence rates in California counties.

  61. Prevalence of glioblastoma multiforme subjects with prior herbicide exposure.

  62. Mortality among white and nonwhite farmers in North Carolina, 1976-1978.

  63. Proportionate mortality study of golf course superintendents.

  64. Glioma and occupational exposure in Sweden, a case-control study.

  65. Lung cancer and other causes of death among licensed pesticide applicators.

    Top of Page





    Breast Cancer


  66. Occupational histories of cancer patients in a Canadian cancer treatment center and the generated hypothesis regarding breast cancer and farming

  67. Identification of occupational cancer risks in British Columbia

  68. Mammographic findings and occupational exposure to pesticides currently in use on Crete

  69. A population-based case-control study of farming and breast cancer in North Carolina

  70. Breast cancer risk in Hispanic agricultural workers in California

  71. Reported residential pesticide use and breast cancer risk on Long Island, New York

  72. Environmental exposure and breast cancer among young women in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

  73. Pesticides and breast cancer risk: a comparison between developed and developing countries

    Top of Page





    Cervical Cancer


  74. Cancer incidence in a cohort of licensed pesticide applicators in Florida

    Top of Page





    Colorectal Cancer


  75. Proportionate mortality study of golf course superintendents

  76. Cancer mortality among Iowa farmers: recent results, time trends, and lifestyle factors (United States)

  77. Cancer incidence among Icelandic pesticide users

  78. Geographical differences of cancer incidence in Costa Rica in relation to environmental and occupational pesticide exposure

  79. Cancer among farmers in central Italy

  80. Pesticide use and colorectal cancer risk in the Agricultural Health Study

  81. Lifestyle, occupational, and reproductive factors and risk of colorectal cancer

  82. Cancer among farmers in central Italy

  83. Heterocyclic aromatic amine pesticide use and human cancer risk: results form the U.S. Agricultural Health Study

  84. Geographical differences of cancer incidence in Costa Rica in relation to environmental and occupational pesticide exposure

  85. Cancer incidence among pesticide applicators exposed to dicamba in the Agricultural Health Study

  86. Cancer incidence among pesticide applicators exposed to trifluralin in the Agricultural Health Study

  87. S-Ethyl-N,N-dipropylthiocarbamate exposure and cancer incidence among male pesticide applicators in the Agricultural health Study: A perspective cohort

    Top of Page





    Eye Cancer


  88. Cancer in offspring of parents engaged in agricultural activities in Norway: incidence and risk factors in the farm environment

  89. Risk of childhood cancers associated with residence in agriculturally intense areas in the United States

    Top of Page





    Gallbladder Cancer


  90. Geographical differences of cancer incidence in Costa Rica in relation to environmental and occupational pesticide exposure

  91. Mortality in a cohort of pesticide applicators in an urban setting: sixty years of follow-up

    Top of Page





    Kidney/Renal Cancer


  92. Cancer among farmers in central Italy

  93. Parental exposures to pesticides and risk of Wilms’ tumor in Brazil

  94. Childhood cancer and paternal employment in agriculture: the role of pesticides

  95. Risk factors for Wilms tumor

  96. Cancer in offspring of parents engaged in agricultural activities in Norway: incidence and risk factors in the farm environment

  97. Wilm’s tumor and exposure to residential and occupational hazardous chemicals

  98. Risk of childhood cancers associated with residence in agriculturally intense areas in the United States

  99. Occupational risk factors for renal-cell carcinoma in Denmark

  100. Occupational risk factors for renal cell cancer. An Italian case-control study.

  101. Renal cell carcinoma and occupational exposure to chemicals in Canada

  102. Renal cell carcinoma, occupational pesticide exposure and modification by glutathione S-transferase polymorphisms

  103. Risk of childhood cancers associated with residence in agriculturally intense areas in the United States

    Top of Page





    Larynx Cancer


  104. Geographical differences of cancer incidence in Costa Rica in relation to environmental and occupational pesticide exposure

    Top of Page





    Leukemia

    Childhood Leukemia

  105. Residential pesticides and childhood leukemia: a systematic review and meta-analysis

  106. Pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia and exposure to pesticides.

  107. Household exposure to pesticides and risk of childhood acute leukaemia

  108. Agricultural pesticide use and childhood cancer in California.

  109. Critical windows of exposure to household pesticides and risk of childhood leukemia.

  110. Transplacental chemical exposure and risk of infant leukemia with MLL gene fusion

  111. Home pesticide use and childhood cancer: A case-control study

  112. A population-based case-control study of childhood leukemia in Shanghai

  113. Environmental factors in childhood leukaemia.

  114. Childhood leukemia and parents' occupational and home exposures.

    Top of Page





    Adult Leukemia


  115. Pesticide sales and adult male cancer mortality in Brazil.

  116. A systematic review of myeloid leukemias and occupational pesticide exposure

  117. Health impacts of pesticide exposure in a cohort of outdoor workers

  118. Childhood cancer and agricultural pesticide use: an ecologic study in California.

  119. Correlation analysis of pesticide use data and cancer incidence rates in California counties.

  120. Cancer mortality in the U.S. flour industry

  121. Mortality among white and nonwhite farmers in North Carolina, 1976-1978.

  122. Lung cancer and other causes of death among licensed pesticide applicators.

    Top of Page





    Lip Cancer


  123. Pesticide sales and adult male cancer mortality in Brazil

  124. Swedish agricultural workers: A group with a decreased risk of cancer

  125. Cancer mortality among Iowa farmers: recent results, time trends, and lifestyle factors (United States)

    Top of Page





    Liver/Hepatic Tumors


  126. Geographical differences of cancer incidence in Costa Rica in relation to environmental and occupational pesticide exposure

  127. Mortality in a cohort of pesticide applicators in an urban setting: sixty years of follow-up

  128. Risk of childhood cancers associated with residence in agriculturally intense areas in the United States

    Top of Page





    Lung Cancer


  129. Cancer incidence among male pesticide applicators in the Agricultural Health Study cohort exposed to diazinon

  130. Pesticides and lung cancer risk in the Agricultural Health Study Cohort

  131. Occupational risk factors for lung cancer among nonsmoking women: a case-control study in Missouri (United States)

  132. Cancer incidence among pesticide applicators exposed to dicamba in the Agricultural Health Study

  133. Cohort mortality and nested case-control study of lung cancer among structural pest control workers in Florida (United States)

  134. Increased risk of lung cancer in pesticide-exposed male agricultural workers

  135. Lung cancer and other causes of death among licensed pesticide applicators

  136. Geographical differences of cancer incidence in Costa Rica in relation to environmental and occupational pesticide exposure

  137. Cancer Incidence Among Pesticide Applicators Exposed to Chlorpyrifos in the Agricultural Health Study

  138. TP53 gene mutations of lung cancer patients inupper northern Thailand and environmental risk factors

  139. Cancer incidence among pesticide applicators exposed to metolachlor in the Agricultural Health Study

    Top of Page





    Lymphoma

    Hodgkin's Lymphoma

  140. Occupation and lymphoid malignancies: results from a French case-control study

  141. Exposure to non-arsenic pesticides is associated with lymphoma among farmers in Spain

  142. Some occupational exposures as risk factors for malignant lymphomas.

    Top of Page





    Lymphoma

    Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

  143. High risk occupations for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in New Zealand: case-control study.

  144. Atopy, exposure to pesticides and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma

  145. Agricultural pesticide use and risk of t(14;18)-defined subtypes of non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

  146. Agricultural risk factors for t(14;18) subtypes of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  147. Pesticide exposures in children with non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

  148. A case-control study of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and exposure to pesticides

  149. Meta-analyses of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and farming.

  150. Farming, pesticide use and hairy-cell leukemia.

  151. Cancer incidence among Icelandic pesticide users.

  152. Proportionate mortality study of golf course superintendents.

  153. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and agricultural practices in the prairie provinces of Canada.

  154. Herbicides and Cancer

  155. Cancer mortality in the U.S. flour industry.

  156. Agricultural herbicide use and a risk of lymphoma and soft-tissue sarcoma.

  157. Farming and mortality from non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: A case-control study

    Top of Page





    Melanoma


  158. The association between residential pesticide use and cutaneous melanoma

  159. Carbaryl exposure and incident cancer in the Agricultural Health Study

  160. Risk of childhood cancers associated with residence in agriculturally intense areas in the United States

  161. Geographical differences of cancer incidence in Costa Rica in relation to environmental and occupational pesticide exposure

  162. Pesticide Use and Cutaneous Melanoma in Pesticide Applicators in the Agricultural Heath Study

    Top of Page





    Mouth Cancer


  163. Cancer of the mouth and pharynx, occupation and exposure to chemical agents in Findland (1971-95)

    Top of Page





    Multiple Myeloma

  164. Incidence and risk factors of cancer among men and women in Norwegian agriculture

  165. Cancer mortality among Iowa farmers: recent results, time trends, and lifestyle factors (United States)

  166. Occupation, exposure to chemicals, sensitizing agents, and risk of multiple myeloma in Sweden

  167. Occupational exposure to pesticides and risk of hematopoietic cancers: meta-analysis of case-control studies

  168. Selected cancer mortality and farm practices in Iowa

  169. Malignant lymphoma and multiple myeloma linked with agricultural occupations in a New Zealand Cancer Registry-based study

  170. Pesticide exposure and risk of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance in the Agricultural Health Study

  171. Residential pesticide exposure and neuroblastoma

  172. Cancer in offspring of parents engaged in agricultural activities in Norway: incidence and risk factors in the farm environment

  173. Mortality and tumour morbidity among Swedish market gardeners and orchardists

  174. Paternal occupational exposures and childhood cancer

  175. Mortality in a cohort of pesticide applicators in an urban setting: sixty years of follow-up

  176. Childhood cancer in Texas counties with moderate to intense agricultural activity

  177. Risk of childhood cancers associated with residence in agriculturally intense areas in the United States

    Top of Page





    Oseophagal Cancer


  178. Geographical differences of cancer incidence in Costa Rica in relation to environmental and occupational pesticide exposure

  179. Airborne occupational exposures and risk of oesophageal and cardia adenocarcinoma

  180. Pesticide sales and adult male cancer mortality in Brazil

    Top of Page





    Ovarian Cancer


  181. Triazine herbicides and ovarian epithelial neoplasms

  182. Geographical differences of cancer incidence in Costa Rica in relation to environmental and occupational pesticide exposure

    Top of Page





    Pancreatic Cancer


  183. Risk of pancreatic cancer and occupational exposures in Spain

  184. Cancer mortality in the U.S. flour industry

  185. Pancreatic cancer and occupational exposures

  186. Pancreatic cancer in industrial branches and occupations in Finland

  187. Occupational exposure to pesticides and pancreatic cancer

  188. Agricultural pesticide use and pancreatic cancer risk in the Agricultural Health Study cohort

  189. Mortality among aerial pesticide applicators and flight instructors: follow-up from 1965-1988

  190. Cancer among farmers in central Italy

  191. Lifestyle, occupational, and reproductive factors in relation to pancreatic cancer risk

  192. Pesticide sales and adult male cancer mortality in Brazil

    Top of Page





    Prostate Cancer


  193. Cancer mortality among Iowa farmers: recent results, time trends, and lifestyle factors (United States)

  194. Mortality among white and nonwhite farmers in North Carolina, 1976-1978

  195. Cancer among farmers in central Italy

  196. Meta-analyses of prostate cancer and farming

  197. Use of agricultural pesticides and prostate cancer risk in the Agricultural Health Study cohort

  198. Cancer incidence in a cohort of licensed pesticide applicators in Florida

  199. A case-control study of farming and prostate cancer in African-American and Caucasian men

  200. Proportionate mortality study of golf course superintendents

  201. Pesticide sales and adult male cancer mortality in Brazil

  202. Prostate cancer risk in California farm workers

  203. Occupation and prostate cancer

  204. Prostate cancer and exposure to pesticides in agricultural settings

  205. Cancer incidence among triazine herbicide manufacturing workers

  206. Occupation and prostate cancer risk in Sweden

  207. Prostate cancer in pesticide applicators in Swedish agriculture

  208. Farming and prostate cancer among African-Americans in the Southeastern Untied States

  209. Farming and prostate cancer mortality

  210. Correlation analysis of pesticide use data and cancer incidence rates in California counties

  211. Agent Orange exposure, Vietnam War veterans, and the risk of prostate cancer

  212. Use of Agricultural Pesticides and Prostate Cancer Risk in the Agricultural Health Study Cohort

    Top of Page





    Sinonasal Cancer


  213. Genotoxicity studies on permethrin, DEET and diazinon in primary human nasal mucosal cells

    Top of Page





    Soft Tissue Sarcoma


  214. Pesticide sales and adult male cancer mortality in Brazil.

  215. Home pesticide use and childhood cancer: a case-control study

  216. Risk factors for soft tissue sarcomas in childhood: a case-control study.

    Top of Page





    Stomach Cancer


  217. Associations between stomach cancer incidence and drinking water contamination with atrazine and nitrate in Ontario (Canada) agroecosystems, 1987-1991

  218. Agricultural exposures and gastric cancer risk in Hispanic farm workers in California

  219. Cancer among farmers in central Italy

    Top of Page





    Testicular Cancer


  220. Cancer incidence in a cohort of licensed pesticide applicators in Florida

  221. Correlation analysis of pesticide use data and cancer incidence rates in California counties

  222. Testicular cancer associated with employment in agriculture and oil and natural gas extraction

    Top of Page





    Thyroid Cancer


  223. Nitrate intake and the risk of thyroid cancer and thyroid disease

  224. Risk of childhood cancers associated with residence in agriculturally intense areas in the United States

    Top of Page





    Uteran Cancer


  225. Geographical differences of cancer incidence in Costa Rica in relation to environmental and occupational pesticide exposure

    Top of Page





    Diabetes


  226. Low Dose of Some Persistent Organic Pollutants Predicts Type 2 Diabetes: A Nested Case-Control Study

  227. An Environment-Wide Association Study (EWAS) on Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

  228. Arsenic Exposure and Prevalence of Type 2 Diabetes in US Adults

  229. Incident Diabetes and Pesticide Exposure among Licensed Pesticide Applicators: Agricultural Health Study, 1993-2003

  230. Environmental pollution and diabetes: a neglected association

  231. Pesticide Exposure and Self-Reported Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in the Agricultural Health Study

  232. Increased Rate of Hospitalization for Diabetes and Residential Proximity of Hazardous Waste Sites

    Top of Page





    Endocrine Disruptors

    (Credit:BP)

    Common household products –detergents, disinfectants, plastics, and pesticides– contain chemical ingredients that enter the body, disrupt hormones and cause adverse developmental, disease, and reproductive problems. Known as endocrine disruptors, these chemicals, which interact with the endocrine system, wreak havoc in humans and wildlife. The endocrine system consists of a set of glands (thyroid, gonads, adrenal and pituitary) and the hormones they produce (thyroxine, estrogen, testosterone and adrenaline), which help guide the development, growth, reproduction, and behavior of animals, including humans. Hormones are signaling molecules, which travel through the bloodstream and elicit responses in other parts of the body.

    Endocrine disruptors function by: (i) Mimicking the action of a naturally-produced hormone, such as estrogen or testosterone, thereby setting off similar chemical reactions in the body; (ii) Blocking hormone receptors in cells, thereby preventing the action of normal hormones; or (iii) Affecting the synthesis, transport, metabolism and excretion of hormones, thus altering the concentrations of natural hormones. Endocrine disruptors have been linked to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, obesity, early puberty, infertility and other reproductive disorders, and childhood and adult cancers.

    More than 50 pesticide active ingredients have been identified as endocrine disruptors by the European Union and endocrine disruptor expert Theo Colborn, PhD. Endocrine disruption is the mechanism for several health effect endpoints. See the related sections (Cancer, Developmental and Learning Disorders, Parkinson’s disease, Reproductive Health) for more information.

    Top of Page





    Learning / Developmental

    Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)


  233. Organophosphate Pesticide Exposure and Attention in Young Mexican-American Children

  234. Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Urinary Metabolites of Organophosphate Pesticides

  235. Long-term sex selective hormonal and behavior alterations in mice exposed to low doses of chlorpyrifos in utero

  236. Impact of environmental chemicals on the thyroid hormone function in pituitary rat GH3 cells

  237. Neurodevelopment and endocrine disruption.

  238. Birth defects, season of conception, and sex of children born to pesticide applicators living in the Red River Valley of Minnesota, USA.

    Top of Page





    Autism


  239. The Rise in Autism and the Role of Age at Diagnosis.

  240. Household Pesticide Use in Relation to Autism

  241. Autism: Transient in utero hypothyroxinemia related to maternal flavonoid ingestion during pregnancy and to other environmental antithyroid agents

  242. Maternal Residence Near Agricultural Pesticide Applications and Autism Spectrum Disorders Among Children in the California Central Valley.

    Top of Page





    Developmental Delays


  243. Neurobehavioral Deficits and Increased Blood Pressure in School-Age Children Prenatally Exposed to Pesticides

  244. Chlorpyrifos Exposure and Urban Residential Environment Characteristics as Determinants of Early Childhood Neurodevelopment

  245. Mind, Disrupted: How Toxic Chemicals May Affect How We Think and Who We Are

  246. Prenatal Airborne Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Exposure and Child IQ at Age 5 Years.

  247. Prenatal Organochlorine Exposure and Measures of Behavior in Infancy Using the Neonatal Behavioral Assessment Scale (NBAS)

  248. Pesticide Exposure and Stunting as Independent Predictors of Neurobehavioral Deficits in Ecuadorian School Children

  249. Impact of Prenatal Chlorpyrifos Exposure on Neurodevelopment in the First 3 Years of Life Among Inner-City Children

  250. Arrested Development: A study on the Human Health Impacts of Pesticides

  251. In Harms Way: Toxic Threats to Child Development.

  252. An Anthropological Approach to the Evaluation of Preschool Children Exposed to Pesticides in Mexico

    Top of Page





    Parkinson's Disease


  253. Paraoxonase 1, agricultural organophosphate exposure, and Parkinson disease

  254. Dopamine Transporter Genetic Variants and Pesticides in Parkinson’s Disease

  255. Well-Water Consumption and Parkinson’s Disease in Rural California

  256. Occupation and Risk of Parkinsonism:

  257. A Multicenter Case-Control Study

  258. Professional exposure to pesticides and Parkinson disease

  259. Ziram Causes Dopaminergic Cell Damage by Inhibiting E1 Ligase of the Proteasome

  260. Pesticide exposure and risk of Parkinson's disease: A family-based case-control study

  261. Pesticide exposure and risk of Parkinson's disease: A family-based case-control study

  262. GSTpi expression mediates dopaminergic neuron sensitivity in experimental parkinsonism

  263. Interaction between genes and environment in neurodegenerative diseases.

  264. Pesticides and Parkinson’s Disease—Is There a Link?

  265. Pesticide exposure and risk for Parkinson's disease

  266. Principles for evaluating health risks in children associated with exposure to chemicals

  267. Parkinson Disease: PD Gene and Oxidative Stress

  268. Developmental pesticide exposures and the Parkinson's disease phenotype.

  269. Pesticides and risk of Parkinson disease: a population-based case-control study.

  270. A fetal risk factor for Parkinson's disease.

  271. No evidence for heritability of Parkinson disease in Swedish twins

  272. Neurodegenerative Diseases and Exposure to Pesticides in the Elderly

  273. Plantation work and risk of Parkinson disease in a population-based longitudinal study.

  274. Environmental Risk Factors and Parkinson's Disease: A Metaanalysis

  275. Parkinsonism and occupational exposure to pesticides

  276. Parkinson's disease mortality and pesticide exposure in California 1984-1994.

  277. Agricultural work and the risk of Parkinson's disease in Denmark, 1981-1993

  278. Exposure to home pesticides linked to Parkinson disease.

  279. A meta-analysis of Parkinson's disease and exposure to pesticides.

  280. Parkinson's disease, pesticides, and glutathione transferase polymorphisms.

  281. The Epidemiology of Parkinson’s Disease in an Australian Population

  282. Gene-toxin interaction as a putative risk factor for Parkinson's disease with dementia.

  283. The Role of the Environment in Parkinson's Disease

  284. Environmental antecedents of young-onset Parkinson's disease

  285. Risk factors for Parkinson's disease

  286. Parkinson's disease and exposure to agricultural work and pesticide chemicals.

  287. Parkinson's disease in Ferrara, Italy, 1967 through 1987

  288. Environmental risk factors in Parkinson's disease

  289. Ecogenetics of Parkinson's disease: prevalence and environmental aspects in rural areas.

    Top of Page






    Reproductive Health


  290. Effects of prenatal exposure to a low dose atrazine metabolite mixture on pubertal timing and prostate development of male Long-Evans rats

  291. Synergistic Disruption of External Male Sex Organ Development by a Mixture of Four Antiandrogens

  292. Fourth National Report on Human Exposure to Environmental Chemicals

  293. Statistical Modeling Suggests That Anti-Androgens in Wastewater Treatment Works Effluents Are Contributing Causes of Widespread Sexual Disruption in Fish Living in English Rivers

  294. Exposure to nonpersistent insecticides and male reproductive hormones.

  295. Impact of PCB and p, p'-DDE Contaminants on Human Sperm Y:X Chromosome Ratio: Studies in Three European Populations and the Inuit Population in Greenland

  296. Exposure to persistent organochlorine pollutants associates with human sperm Y:X chromosome ratio

  297. Epigenetic Transgenerational Actions of Endocrine Disruptors and Male Fertility

  298. Low-Dose Agrochemicals and Lawn-Care Pesticides Induce Developmental Toxicity in Murine Preimplantation Embryos

  299. Methoxychlor Disrupts Uterine Hoxa10 Gene Expression

  300. Effect of Endosulfan on Male Reproductive Development

  301. Semen quality in relation to biomarkers of pesticide exposure.

  302. Geographic differences in semen quality of fertile U.S. males.

  303. Risk factors for female infertility in an agricultural region

  304. Developmental Toxicity of a Commercial Herbicide Mixture in Mice: I. Effects on Embryo Implantation and Litter Size

  305. Contribution of environmental factors to the risk of male infertility

  306. Environmental antiandrogens: low doses of the fungicide vinclozolin alter sexual differentiation of the male rat.

    Top of Page



How can we help you reduce the risks?
  1. Help you terminate your existing pest control company if they have ever sprayed a single drop of toxin on your property;

  2. If you do not have a pest control company, refrain from spraying any pesticides yourself - we offer emergency services at no additonal cost;

  3. Have us decontaminate as much of your home as possible and remove as much toxic pesticide residue as possible;

  4. Let us care for your pest control needs and keep unsanitary disease-causing insects away from you, your baby, and your family with our all-natural, non-toxic products that are "Safe Around Children and Pets;"

  5. Let us give you a license to re-print our website and share it with your friends and family;

  6. Do not purchase or handle synthetic pesticides for any reason;

  7. If a member of your family handles synthetic pesticides, be certain to refrain from contact with their clothes and have them wash their own clothes at high temperature with a detergent containing colloidal silver, a non-toxic anti-microbial, and separate from any of your garments;

  8. If you have synthetic pesticides in your home or garage, let us remove them and dispose of them for you. Do not touch or handle them yourself.





Click here to Schedule Your Service
Call AlwaysEco toll free 1(855)AlwaysEco or 1(855) 259-2973

Military Discount
We pay referrals up to $200 Opportunities
Contact Us
Home Get Eco Certified
 
Customer Care Log In




AlwaysEco ® Inc • Austin Texas Headquarters • TDA TPCL No. 0579505 • Office Toll Free 1(855) AlwaysEco / 1(855) 259-2973
Licensed and regulated by: Texas Department of Agriculture • PO BOX 12847 • AUSTIN, TX 78711-2847 • Phone (866) 918-4481 • Fax (888) 232-2567
Copyright © 2005-2011 AlwaysEco,Inc • All Rights Reserved • Unauthorized Duplication Strictly Prohibited • No Part of This Page May Be Duplicated Without Written Permission

AlwaysEco,Inc. is a Texas Corporation